Posts Tagged ‘Trees’

District 10 sets aside $250,000 for Guadalupe Oak Grove Park woodland management

On December 4, 2017, Mollie Tobias of the City’s Adopt-a-Park program and her crew, including our Parks, Recreation & Neighborhood Services maintenance team, supported the Swath Project in the Guadalupe Oak Grove Park.  You may recall that the Swath is a section of our park, between the east and central trails, 30 foot wide and about 420 foot long, in which 1-year Blue and Valley Oak seedlings were flagged.

These small ‘starts’ have been out competed by Coast Live Oak saplings for years.  They are encroaching from two main areas: the dog-park entry area, near the Villas of Almaden and the main GOGP entry off of Thorntree.  As a result, our open Blue and Valley oak woodland on the Valley floor has been transitioning to a closed Oak woodland.  It was initially thought that the Blue and Valley oaks were not regenerating.  However, Lee Pauser, Dave Poeschel and I found that these starts were there and were just being out-competed by Coast Live Oak saplings and the unmanaged European grasses.

The idea of the Swath is to demonstrate this regeneration by removing the Coast Live Oak saplings, then caging the Blue and Valley Oak starts to protect them from wildlife, providing occasional summer water, and promoting their establishment through the removal of weeds and grasses adjacent to these starts. Preserving the unique GOGP (one of the last two remaining Valley and Oak woodlands in the Santa Clara Valley) requires woodland management and Monday’s effort is a first step!   Thanks to the commitment of District 10 and our Councilman Johnny Khamis, funding at a level of $250K has been set-aside to involve H.T. Harvey and Associates, environmental consultants, in the woodland management of this park!

We ant to thank the dozen volunteers from the Signifyd Company for their help in coordination with project leads Lee Pauser and I.  Ninety-five percent of the scheduled work was performed between 1:30 and 4:30 p.m. on the workday!  I’m sure there will be a lot of sore muscles and a few bruises at Signifyd come Tuesday!

Park users should see a notable difference in the condition of the park in the area of the Swath.  This is illustrated in the photo comparison below.

Thanks again to all involved.

Patrick Pizzo

 

Dozens of trees going to be planted in TJ Martin & Jeffrey Fontana parks

Our City Forest demonstrates how it’s done

The following is a San Jose Mercury News article by | jbaum@bayareanewsgroup.com | Bay Area News Group on

“The trees will replace those removed earlier this year under Pacific Gas and Electric Company’s gas pipeline safety program.”

“Workers from Our City Forest and the Martin-Fontana Parks Association will provide the new trees during two planting parties at the parks, one on Dec. 16 and the other on Jan. 6. Another couple dozen trees will be planted in the Shadow Brook neighborhood by the local neighborhood association with help from Our City Forest on Dec. 2, according to Councilman Johnny Khamis.”

To read the rest of the story go to Tree Planting.

According to Martin-Fontana Parks Association Director, Richard Zahner, the City’s Parks, Recreation, & Neighborhood Services has committed to provide the water needed to establish the 55 trees. Our City Forest has committed to watering the trees and providing care such as trimming and shaping to assure their survival through the first three years. At that time the trees should be established and should require no more than the routine care provided by PRNS.   In practice the first year will the most demanding, requiring 15 gallons per week.

‘Tree Gator’, a type of plastic water bag

A ‘Tree Gator’, a type of plastic water bag, may be used to control and concentrate the water where it is most beneficial. Watering will be incrementally reduced over the second and third years to promote healthy roots and sustainable growth.

Richard also serves as the Park Planning and Improvement Chairperson for MFPA.

 

Please don’t pick the flowers. Oops! I meant to say FLAGS….

 

 

You may have seen green/blue and red irrigation flags in one area of Guadalupe Oak Grove Park between two of the main walking trails.  These flags represent a project being done in cooperation with District 10.  They mark a 30 foot-wide swath from trail to trail, and all the one-year old, baby Valley and Blue Oak shoots that are growing within.  These shoots are to be ‘caged’ in chicken wire cages to protect them, watered and encouraged to live as they are to be the replacement trees for the Blue and Valley Oak trees we are losing to the extended drought and other issues.  The flags are there because after the deciduous native oak trees drop their leaves they will be ‘invisible’ but for the subsequent caging.  Blue and Valley Oaks will not regenerate due to the high-weed and grass load in the park and the out-competing Coast Live Oaks which are overtaking the open Savannah.

Thanks for your understanding and cooperation.

 

 

 

Pat Pizzo

PG&E will PAY to have OCF plant a tree in your front yard

Replacement trees will be planted before the end of the year to replace all those removed from Almaden Expressway as part of the PG&E Gas Line Safety Program. Your Martin-Fontana Parks Association has negotiated for allocating 55 trees to the two parks and a few to replace dead street trees on adjacent streets.

All new trees will be selected and planted by Our City Forest, a non-profit dedicated to planting trees through out the City.

If you have room for a new tree, please send an email to SaveOurParkTrees@gmail.com to be considered. We have a limited number of trees for this program so please respond soon and get put on the list. Since the number of trees is limited there is no guarantee that every request will be fulfilled. We will submit a list to OCF soon – Do you want a free tree?

PG&E Gas Pipeline Safety & Our Trees

Martin-Fontana Park Association Board Members Linda Wilson, Rod Carpenter and Rich Zahner met with Don Hall and two other PG&E representatives recently to discuss two issues.

The MFPA agenda was our request that PG&E fund the proposed Sustainable Parks Initiative (SPI). We requested $20,000 from PG&E in 2017 to be matched by MFPA to plant trees and bushes, complement the PRNS Staff, and improve the appearance and utility of the Parks.

The PG&E agenda was to explain the Gas Transmission Pipeline safety program being conducted by PG&E. See the PG&E memo below for details. In summary they will remove about 150 trees along Almaden Expressway located over the gas pipeline that supplies all of the valley. The trees are on both City and County property (no private property as far we know) between McAbee Road and Rajkovich Way. PG&E is committed to replacing the trees. The question is where and they suggested planting a number of trees in both TJ Martin Park and Jeffrey Fontana Park. We did not object to the idea and talked generally about numbers, types and location.

PG&E held an Information Table at the Fontana Dog Park entrance on Saturday the 11th of February from 8AM to 11AM. The work to remove trees is likely to begin in late spring. We might get them to spread the wood chips as mulch for the Parks bare spaces.

PG&E’s memo on the program:

img_new

Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) is working with the City of San Jose and Santa Clara County to help ensure safety crews have immediate access to natural gas transmission pipelines in case of an emergency or for important maintenance work. This gas safety work involves removing and replacing trees and structures that are located too close to the gas pipeline and could delay access for first responders or damage the pipeline. Work is expected to begin this spring on Almaden Expressway between McAbee Road and Rajkovich Way. Please note there is no work taking place at TJ Martin Park or Jeffrey Fontana Park. PG&E understands how important trees are to the local community, and will work closely with residents in close proximity to the work to offer replacement trees to be planted at a safe distance from the pipeline.

For more information about the planned safety work, please contact PG&E customer outreach specialist Emily Sloan at 1-650-737-2001 or emily.sloan@pge.com. You can also learn more about all of PG&E’s ongoing gas safety efforts at pge.com/GasSafety.

Emily Sloan      Customer Outreach Specialist, Senior

Pacific Gas and Electric Company

Office: (650) 598-7278

Cell: (650) 737-2001

Email: emily.sloan@pge.com

Learn more about PG&E’s gas safety efforts at pge.com/GasSafety

pge-cpsi-district-10-almaden-expressway-fact-sheet_011217

Is the drought killing trees?

In the interest of saving trees we offer the following:

San Jose Mercury News 09-12-2015
Residents’ efforts to conserve may be fueling the problem

By Kevin Kelly

kkelly@dailynewsgroup.com

MENLO PARK — The city claims the heritage oak as its symbol, but the actual trees that line its streets might not feel particularly adored.

The leader of the city’s Fire Department says some trees along his route are in such sad shape that he recently brought up the idea of forming a task force to make sure they’re getting enough water during the drought, now in its fourth year. He even broached the idea of sending firefighters out in a truck to water threatened trees along the rights of way if the cities in its coverage area were unwilling to set up a system to monitor the trees’ health.

Follow the link below to view the article.
http://sanjosemercurynews.ca.newsmemory.com/publink.php?shareid=2dd02d63b

Helpful info is also provided at:  http://saveourwater.com/what-you-can-do/tips/landscaping/save-our-water-and-our-trees/

 

2015 Tree Trimming to Begin Soon

IMG_3746

Our evaluation team consisting of Pier Maggiani and Patrick Pizzo, have walked the park and marked all the trees that need to be trimmed, or removed because they are dead or diseased. Martin-Fontana Parks Association  (MFPA ) annually shares the cost with  the City’s Parks, Recreation and Neighborhood Services (PRNS) by using the City contractor to work on our trees. Soon tree crews will be at work to complete the trimming/removal for this winter. Trees will be evaluated again after nesting season is completed.

Stressed Trees

Pier and Patrick have also identified 43 trees as severely stressed by our last three years of drought. MFPA has contracted to pay Our City Forest (OCF) $15 per tree for mulching services. OCF will clear the area around each tree and heavily mulch the tree in an effort to capture and retain as much water as possible. This will be completed in February.