Posts Tagged ‘Parks’

Take a walk around Almaden Lake Park

For more information:
Call (408) 535-4910 or Email michele.dexter@sanjoseca.gov

Guadalupe Oak Grove Park “Cluster-Buster” project completed

This morning, Patrick Pizzo and Lee Pauser implemented a “Cluster-Buster” plan, cleared with the City of San Jose- PRNS (Parks, Recreation and Neighborhood Services), in the Guadalupe Oak Grove Park.  This work was done near the J. Fontana West entry to the GOGP near the dog park.  The ‘cluster’ was a group of Quercus agrifolia saplings, encircling a ‘mother’ tree at the intersection of two of the main park trails in the GOGP.  One can identify the area by the tree-trimmings just adjacent the trail.  The trimmings should be gone by mid-week.   The before and after photos  of the work-area are illustrated below.

Why was this done?  The mature trees that define the oak woodland at this entry point, and throughout much of the flat-plain of our park, are Quercus douglasii (Blue Oak) and Quercus lobata (Valley Oak).  They are deciduous native oaks.  The trees in our park are at least 200 years old, especially the Blue Oak (very slow growing).  The Q. Agrifolia is an evergreen tree, and it is a recent entry to our park.  It is concentrated near the main entry to GOGP and in the area at the S-W corner, near the Villas of Almaden.   It is prolific in the urban area surrounding the GOGP, it is fast growing, and it is rapidly becoming a dominant tree. It’s acorns thrive on the valley floor.  Q. agrifolia out competes the Blue and Valley oaks.  Leaving nature take its course would convert the park from an open oak woodland to a closed oak woodland.  Note too that Q. agrifolia is subject to sudden-oak-death (S.O.D.) whereas the Blue and Valley Oaks are not.  So in addition to becoming a closed oak woodland, the GOGP would be more susceptible to S.O.D. issues.

The cluster in our subject-title is one of the young Coast Live Oaks (CLO) saplings that surround the edge of the canopy of the established CLO’s.  They were out competing young Blue and Valley oak saplings in that area.  Proof of this became evident when these saplings were removed; among the saplings were Blue and Valley seedlings which are now open to direct sunlight, the conditions required to establish these trees.  We found about 30 Blue and Valley Oak seedlings among the CLO saplings!   If we are vigilant in removing subsequent CLO seedlings and if we remove the circle of European grasses and weeds that will surround each of them, (they too out-compete the Blue and Valley Oak starts, by grabbing moisture and nutrients), come Spring, we can get the Blue and Valley Oak seedlings to survive 3 years to four years out, it should allow them sufficient time to get established.  In this way, we will be preserving the GOGP.

If you want proof of the spreading of Q. agrifolia evergreen trees in the park, go to Google Earth and look at the historical aerial views.  One can see the expansion of the CLO footprint throughout the park.

San Jose staff whips Almaden area parks into shape

TJ Martin Park Soccer Fields

Here’s an article by Julia Baum | jbaum@bayareanewsgroup.com | Bay Area News Group dated September 20, 2017:

Several parks in the Almaden Valley area should be in top shape after San Jose public works crews checked off a long list of improvements throughout the summer that have all finally been finished.

The upgrades range from simple replacements such as new solar LEDs at Chris Hotts Park to redoing the playground surface at Vista Park to rehabilitating the soccer fields at TJ Martin and Jeffrey Fontana parks.

For the rest of the story go to:  http://www.mercurynews.com/2017/09/20/san-jose-staff-whips-almaden-area-parks-into-shape/

Martin-Fontana Parks Association recognized at CPRS dinner

On Thursday the 23rd of February, the Martin-Fontana Parks Association was recognized at this year’s California Parks and Rec Society (CPRS) Appreciation Dinner held at the Quinlan Community Center in Cupertino.

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Representing MFPA at the event, from left to right were Ron Wilson, Dick Stevens, Ellie Carpenter, Rod Carpenter, Johnny Khamis, Mike Kalashian, Nancy Kalashian, Larry Sasscer, and Linda Wilson. (Photo provided by Johnny Khamis)

A letter from Jean Dresden of the San Jose Park Advocates

Here’s a letter, dated Feb. 5th, from Jean Dresden.  Jean is a member of the San Jose Park Advocates sjpagroup (an all volunteer group of neighborhood association leaders).  This letter was presented to the San Jose City Council Neighborhood Services & Education, (NSE), committee. In It you will find a good summary of current San Jose park issues.

 

Here’s a link to read the letter:  parkconditionsnse2017feb9item3sjparksadvocates.

 

MARTIN-FONTANA PARKS ASSOCIATION MEMBERSHIP DRIVE

WANT TO TAKE YOUR CHILDREN OR GRANDCHILDREN TO THE PLAYGROUND ?

WANT TO TAKE YOUR DOG TO THE DOG PARK ?

WANT TO SIT ON A PARK BENCH AND ENJOY A PLEASANT MORNING ?

WANT TO SEE AND SMELL THE BLOSSOMS OF SPRING AND

ENJOY THE SHADE THAT OUR PARK TREES PROVIDE ?

WANT TO ENJOY A BUTTERFLY GARDEN?

ALL OF THESE THINGS CAN CONTINUE AND IMPROVE

WITH YOUR MEMBERSHIP SUPPORT.

 

The Martin-Fontana Parks Association is having its annual membership drive during the months of January and February.  Our mission is to help beautify our two parks, maintain and enhance the trees and plantings we have, and to save the parks for the future.

Individual memberships are $20 per year

Family memberships are $35 per year

*Membership applications may be found in the information box attached to the kiosk in front of the Jeffrey Fontana dog park or on our website

Please consider joining us as we seek to improve and preserve our two parks here in Almaden valley.

Please note: We are a tax-exempt organization under section 501(c) (3) of the Internal Revenue Code.

District 9 Councilmember Donald Rocha submits Memorandum on Park Maintenance to City Council Rules Committee

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The following is a quote from Councilmember Rocha’s newsletter:

“Dear Neighbor,

Over recent months, I’ve received an increasing number of complaints from residents about the condition of parks in my district. Residents report problems such as dead grass, dead trees, overgrown weeds and decaying fixtures. In many cases they have waited patiently for these problems to be fixed, but are increasingly frustrated at the City’s continued inability to address their concerns. (As an example of the kinds of complaints I’ve heard, I’ve included some pictures of our parks at the end of this newsletter.) Given the seriousness of the problem, I have issued a memorandum intended to help bring forward potential solutions to the problem in time for next year’s City budget.”

Click here to read Councilmember Rocha’s memorandum