Archive for the ‘Drought’ Category

Please don’t pick the flowers. Oops! I meant to say FLAGS….

 

 

You may have seen green/blue and red irrigation flags in one area of Guadalupe Oak Grove Park between two of the main walking trails.  These flags represent a project being done in cooperation with District 10.  They mark a 30 foot-wide swath from trail to trail, and all the one-year old, baby Valley and Blue Oak shoots that are growing within.  These shoots are to be ‘caged’ in chicken wire cages to protect them, watered and encouraged to live as they are to be the replacement trees for the Blue and Valley Oak trees we are losing to the extended drought and other issues.  The flags are there because after the deciduous native oak trees drop their leaves they will be ‘invisible’ but for the subsequent caging.  Blue and Valley Oaks will not regenerate due to the high-weed and grass load in the park and the out-competing Coast Live Oaks which are overtaking the open Savannah.

Thanks for your understanding and cooperation.

 

 

 

Pat Pizzo

District 9 Councilmember Donald Rocha submits Memorandum on Park Maintenance to City Council Rules Committee

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The following is a quote from Councilmember Rocha’s newsletter:

“Dear Neighbor,

Over recent months, I’ve received an increasing number of complaints from residents about the condition of parks in my district. Residents report problems such as dead grass, dead trees, overgrown weeds and decaying fixtures. In many cases they have waited patiently for these problems to be fixed, but are increasingly frustrated at the City’s continued inability to address their concerns. (As an example of the kinds of complaints I’ve heard, I’ve included some pictures of our parks at the end of this newsletter.) Given the seriousness of the problem, I have issued a memorandum intended to help bring forward potential solutions to the problem in time for next year’s City budget.”

Click here to read Councilmember Rocha’s memorandum 

 

San Jose Mercury News interviews MFPA President Linda Wilson concerning park conditions

Martin, Fontana parks get a boost

By Julia Baum

jbaum@bayareanewsgroup.com

SAN JOSE — Preserving some of the city’s most prized natural treasures has been an ongoing challenge for the Martin-Fontana Parks Association, which hosts its seventh annual “Heart of the Park” fundraiser and membership drive on Saturday.

This year, the volunteer group is spotlighting its struggle to maintain or upgrade TJ Martin and Jeffrey Fontana parks with dwindling resources.

The group and San Jose’s parks and recreation department want to see new irrigation systems and turf installed in three areas, including the soccer fields. Native plants and mature oak trees thrive in the 33 acres that make up both parks, but non-native assets such as a grove of redwoods have been struggling to survive this past year due to budget cuts, drought and even gophers and squirrels.

Click here to read the rest of the article.

Seventeen Trees Planted in our Parks

On Sat. June 18th., a crew from Our City Forest, along with volunteers, planted a total of 17 trees at TJ Martin and Jeffrey Fontana Parks.  OCF worked with the City’s Parks, Recreation, and Neighborhood Services Department to determine the planting locations.  All trees planted were on  PG&E’s approved tree list for trees under power lines. Twelve trees were planted in east TJ Martin Park near Meridian Ave.
Two trees were planted along the curb of Oakglen Way in Jeffrey Fontana Park,
two were planted along the curb south of the dog parks, and
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one was planted near the Fontana statue.
Funds were provided by a grant OCF had for tree planting and watering.  Thanks so much for all the hard work provided by the volunteers.  This will help to replace some of the many dead trees felled by the drought.

Our Quarter Three Newsletter is out!

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Click here to read the whole NEWSLETTER

Is the drought killing trees?

In the interest of saving trees we offer the following:

San Jose Mercury News 09-12-2015
Residents’ efforts to conserve may be fueling the problem

By Kevin Kelly

kkelly@dailynewsgroup.com

MENLO PARK — The city claims the heritage oak as its symbol, but the actual trees that line its streets might not feel particularly adored.

The leader of the city’s Fire Department says some trees along his route are in such sad shape that he recently brought up the idea of forming a task force to make sure they’re getting enough water during the drought, now in its fourth year. He even broached the idea of sending firefighters out in a truck to water threatened trees along the rights of way if the cities in its coverage area were unwilling to set up a system to monitor the trees’ health.

Follow the link below to view the article.
http://sanjosemercurynews.ca.newsmemory.com/publink.php?shareid=2dd02d63b

Helpful info is also provided at:  http://saveourwater.com/what-you-can-do/tips/landscaping/save-our-water-and-our-trees/

 

TREES IN PERIL ACROSS STATE

Saving water during drought yields unintended consequence

By Lisa M. Krieger

lkrieger@mercurynews.com

The rush to save water is claiming legions of unintended casualties — California’s trees.

Specimens that have stood tall and strong for decades are stressed and dying because of the drought, as Californians turn off spigots to comply with Gov. Jerry Brown’s mandatory conservation measures.

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PATRICK TEHAN/STAFF PHOTOS

HOW TO SAVE YOUR TREES

Clear grass to at least 6 inches from the trunk’s base. Some arborists suggest clearing it to the tree’s drip line.Cover the area with wood chips or other mulch to help maintain soil moisture, being careful not to let mulch touch the trunk.If the tree is younger than 5 years old, it needs 10 to 15 gallons of water per week during the growing season. Water established trees once a month, applying 10 gallons for each inch of the trunk’s diameter. Established oaks should be watered only during the Bay Area’s normal rainy season when there’s no precipitation.Water trees slowly, using a soaker hose or drip system. Continue watering a tree until the soil from beneath the canopy to slightly outside the drip line is moist 12 to 18 inches below the surface.

Read the rest of the article here.