Coyotes observed in Quadalupe Oak Grove Park

Coyote

It is important that everyone traversing the interior part of Quadalupe Oak Grove Park be aware that the coyotes have returned to the park. In walking the main circular trail in the vicinity of the restrooms at 9 a.m. today (Labor Day) two coyotes were observed crossing the main path about 30 yards west of the restrooms. Since these are normally nocturnal animals I assume  they were either ill or desperate for food to come so close to people in broad daylight.  Of course the message to the residents of the Villas is obvious as well.

As reported by N. Steuer

 

7 responses to this post.

  1. Sorry Coyotes are not primarily nocturnal, it is not uncommon to see them during the morning hours of which 9AM this time of year is considered morning. They are seen during the day. These are opportunistic eaters and will be out and about when their prey is, mostly rodents. Not a problem, keep your small dogs with you or inside, same for cats. Be glad we have them, they keep down the rat and mouse level. Rather have a Coyote (aka Song Dog, Gods Dog) than a Mountain Lion prowling around. Not a biggie, just be aware and know how to conduct yourself in their presence.

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  2. Posted by Dave Poeschel on September 3, 2013 at 8:52 am

    It is not unusual to see coyotes in the daytime. They have adapted to nocturnal activities in urban areas to avoid human contact but are primarily diurnal and most active at dawn and dusk so I don’t think there should be any extra concern about the coyotes being ill.

    While coyotes should ALWAYS be considered dangerous and never approached, coyote attacks on humans are extremely rare. There are only two known fatal attacks in North America (with several hundred million people. Compare to deer which kill over a hundred people annually.)

    I would not want to arouse extra concern since when people get afraid vector control kills coyotes out of political necessity rather than out of a true concern for safety.

    Coyotes are an important element of rodent control and hence valuable in control of vectors of disease.

    Sincerely,
    Dave Poeschel

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  3. Posted by Patrick Pizzo on September 3, 2013 at 3:15 pm

    At the Urban/Woodland interface, it is not uncommon at all to see coyote, fox and/or bobcat during the daylight hours. What is drawing the coyote to the GOGP is the high-population of ground squirrels, gophers, and other rodents, food-source for the coyote. We have had a dramatic increase in the population of these critters (ground squirrels and gophers in particular) over the last couple of years, with little or no vector-control management to control their numbers. A good way to control the incidence of coyote interaction is to control the food-source. We need effective management of the ground squirrel and gopher populations, and in the network of their burrows [ie, habitat] in the three contiguous parks (GOGP, J. Fontana and T.J. Martin).

    p.p. pizzo

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    • Actually you do not need any interference in the natural scheme of things. It is a natural area, in fact one of the most natural in Santa Clara County considering where it is. Just let the normal predators do the work, when they have established a balance they will go on to someplace else where they can do their natural behavior.

      You cannot have it both ways, a very natural unique wild area and a place of controlled habitat and controlled flora & fauna. Everything in nature has a domino effect, its totally balanced and then we come along and “manage” it, there go the dominos. Chaos..

      The climate changes, food availability and the predators will naturally handle any over amount of little critters, we just had the last of the baby seasons, during the coming Winter the numbers will dwindle, they always do. The forces of nature at work.

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  4. Posted by Patrick Pizzo on September 3, 2013 at 6:13 pm

    “From: gail haywood
    Date: Tue, Sep 3, 2013 at 10:54 AM
    Subject: Re: [Fontana-Martin Parks 816] Coyotes observed
    To: Martin-Fontana Parks Association

    Four weeks ago our cat was attacked by coyotes in the early morning on Post Oak Circle in the Villas. We were able to save her with the help of emergency vets. She is still recovering, but will make it.

    This morning our neighbor on the corner of Post Oak Circle and Poker Flats had his cat attacked by two coyotes. She is wounded but escaped. These streets are on the back side of the Villas close to Quadalupe Oak Grove Park.

    Perhaps they are looking for water?”
    ++++++++++++++++
    A terrible experience! This is a repeat of the situation that occurred some years back (maybe 7 or 8 years?) in the Villas. I believe you worked with Vector Control, City of San Jose; and you should probably begin that process.

    They really are not looking for water. They have access to the various creeks about (Guadalupe, los Alimitos, Golf Creek…. etc), access to home irrigation, pet dishes outside and such. They are predators of cats and small dogs. To keep the pets safe, they will have to be kept indoors and/or only on leash. Small dogs are at risk, even on a leash!

    The urban landscape is the food source for the ground squirrels, gophers, rats and other varmints that attract the coyote. The range for a rat is determined by the distance between outdoor pet food sources, garbage cans, fruit-trees and the like. In Almaden Valley, that is about 10 foot distance, item-to-item! How many ground squirrels do you see on a walk through J. Fontana Park and/or the GOGP? Too many! This draws the coyote in and away from what is available to them in the wild, especially toward the end of summer and the beginning of Fall.

    I am afraid it is human behavior combined with our encroachment into the natural woodlands that presents this problem. However, many people welcome these visits of wild mammals (coyote, fox, wildcat) to our neighborhoods. I am one of them. It is pretty awesome to see a deer in your front yard, even if she is munching on the rose buds! If there is one thing I would recommend as concerns our area of Almaden Valley it is to 1) encourage our parks to manage the gopher and ground-squirrel populations, 2) encourage all residents to deal with fruited trees in their yard in a responsible way, and 3) be a responsible pet owner as regards cats and dogs (ie, don’t place their food outdoors, don’t allow cats to free-range, etc). We could have the best of both worlds; the urban landscape and the woodland wildlife!

    pppizzo

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  5. AS TO THE COYOTE AND CAT CONFLICTS. CATS SHOULD BE INDOORS OR HAVE ANY OF YOU LOOKED INTO A CAT FENCE. THEY ARE WONDERFUL, YOUR CAT CANNOT GET OUT OF THE YARD AND NOTHING CAN GET IN. THEY ARE EASY TO INSTALL AND LAST FOR YEARS. CHECK IT OUT. KEEP YOUR PETS IN/ON YOUR PROPERTY http://www.catfencein.com/ CHECK THIS OUT,

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